In the Greening

Most recent trip to the Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia where I saw my final uncommoncommonart.  Another great day.  If the summer hadn’t have been so dry the rush of water in the stream would have increased the full sensual experience.  

The location was perfect and a wonderful end to the art and nature treasure hunt.


This could be haunting at dusk and closer to Halloween.  It looked and felt  like an abandoned civilization.


The above photos are of Gaspereau Vineyards first as seen after the gloaming. 

Then Luckett’s Vineyards with their wonder views of the sacred Cape Blomidon.  They also have a British red phone box in the vineyard and you can call anywhere in North America for free.  Look for it in the first photo.

It was too crowded for lunch that day but I instead went to Troy in Wolfville and forgot to take a picture of the vegetarian platter until it was too late.  Oops!  Yum and very shareable.

See resto below-nice Turkish decor.   



Luckett Vineyards.  There is some green in this pic.  

LaHave River to Petite Riviere

Leaving Bridgewater which is the biggest town on the South Shore of Nova Scotia, you can loop down via the LaHave River which is mellow with many nice houses despite becoming increasingly remote with old houses and churches and buildings related to fishing.

In my last post I mentioned the LaHave Bakery outlet in Mahone Bay but the main one is found here near where a ferry traverses the river.  It was bought by some people from Montreal and many places in the area seem to have attracted people from other places- such is the draw of the area.  One came to paint the murals in the supermarket from Toronto and stayed.  Others have an art gallery.  See this  post-https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaHave,_Nova_Scotia

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The LaHave Bakery is housed in a very old building and they even have on old style cash register.  Besides the fresh bread you can buy things such as pizza slices.  Cyclists are attracted to this route and everyone has the choice of sitting inside or out on the front deck on adirondack chairs or even at picnic tables, weather willing.

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Next there is a park with a small museum.  Later you will come to Crescent Beach which is on of a few beaches that you can actually drive on.  I remember as a child being on this beach having corn boils or lobster boils or maybe it was clams as we used to dig for them.  Nowadays mussels have replaced clams are they are tasty and more easily found but back then they were shunned and we just used them to catch crabs we later threw back or even killed on the road I am sad to say.

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Then comes Risser’s Beach which is very nice with a lovely view of drumlins on the hill and an inlet area popular with boaters and birds.  The boardwalk here is lovely.  The beach has full facilities and campgrounds.  I have heard it is one of the most popular campgrounds in Nova Scotia.  You can park in the campgrounds and walk under the road through a tunnel to reach the beach.  At first I found this confusing.  I didn’t know where to park.  Go to the campground area across the road from the beach for free parking.  Unlike places such as PEI, NS beaches are free even when serviced with lifeguards, canteens, showers and small museums.  What more could you ask?

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After this is a small convenience store where I usually get an ice cream.  At this junction you could turn left to Green Bay where there are cottages, a small beach and a canteen with ice cream etc. or you could go right to Petite Riviere where there is an Art Gallery type shop and beyond that as you see the relaxing river on your right you will eventually come to the Petite Riviere Vineyard where you can try some wines.

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After that carry on back to Highway 103 where you originally turned off to Bridgewater.  There is an interesting veggie stand en route back to Bridgewater or beyond.  It’s in Hebb’s Cross and called Bob and the Boys Farm Market.  You can also get ice cream there.