Canadian Food

As we get ready to celebrate Canada 150 it is time to find out what is Canadian food. A few items on the list surprised even me. 

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/06/28/canadian-food_n_2869764.html
I used to live abroad and had Coffee crisp bars sent to me. I didn’t know they were only in Canada, eh?  Also liked Kitkats for dipping in tea and coffee. But they were more international. 

I ‘ve made Nanaimo bars and like extra butter in the second layer. 


Of course there are pancakes with maple syrup but I didn’t know butter tarts were Canadian. 


I have seen Canadian pizza on the menu even abroad.  It is often pepperoni, bacon, mushrooms and cheese. 

There is also Hawaiian pizza invented by a man in Ontario. It has tomato, ham, pineapple and cheese. Some people add green peppers and mushrooms. 


And California maki rolls may be Canadian too I read.  They have avocado, cucumber and imitation crab.  Guess we often don’t name things after ourselves. 

Our Chinese restaurants have plum sauce for egg rolls.  Not sure what others have.  It is not made from plums though.  Pumpkin I believe. 

The above Canadian food link mentions many foods from Nova Scotia though I would add we have one of the biggest blueberry crops. Also shrimps and scallops though they seem to be exported a lot.  Smoked mackerel is nice.  Australian  and B.C. visitors have raved about pan-fried haddock.  

I like Canadian wine and cheese too.   There are lots of craft beer and I saw people buying Canadian Iceberg Vodka for Caesar day today.  See a previous post to understand this yummy drink. I just found out that this vodka is actually made from pure iceberg water in Newfoundland. 

We try any foreign thing we can as well.  After all we have many immigrants and many people love to travel. Many cities have large communities of people from elsewhere and sometimes they create fusions or twists on things. 

But when I think of Canadian food I think of fresh and simple ingredients.  We used to have clam bakes and corn or lobster boils on the beach. All you needed was butter and salt to season.  Vinegar for lobster.   Mussels have replaced clams and are done in a broth but can still be dipped in butter or vinegar. There are seafood chowders preferably with fish, seafood and potatoes with a roll. 

Also when you get fresh beets, corn, potatoes or green beans you just add butter and enjoy.  Love fresh strawberries or peaches. 

This is why you won’t ever see Canadian restaurants abroad.  It is mostly fresh local food done simply. You have to be there to enjoy it and relax in the wilderness or small town or city preferably. You may even see some wildlife. 

See you for Canada 150 this year!

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